First Playtest: Candlelight

5826e2492b9de503630986c7f5df09fcSo, tonight marked the first playtest of Candlelight.

I haven’t talked about it much, but Candlelight (working title!), is a project I’m developing for down the road.

It uses some pretty unique ideas I’ve been stewing on for a while (the first attempt at this game was several years ago), and I tried to deliver those in a uniquely cool storytelling package designed to tell a different sort of story than the one most players are used to.

I’ve been sort of fleshing out the setting, and discussing possibilities with a possible co-writer, but nothings really moving forward, so that’s different.

This was an alpha test: the literal first session of the mechanics. I assembled a new playtesting team for this game, one that has never tried to play in a game I designed from the group up.

First thoughts, go!

  1. No dice mechanic was a success. I was concerned it wouldn’t be intuitive but it seemed to catch on really fast, and my alternate resolution system worked wonders.
  2. Simple classes and abilities worked. This was a nice success. The “classes” or “archetypes” worked wonderfully and got players right into the theme, while allowing them to feel different.
  3. The Dread Track mechanic worked wonders. I liked it, and I think it landed exactly at the right tempo.
  4. The resource management mechanics I’d worked in seemed good, but there were some scaling issues, so when I have time (ie. not working on Tiny Galaxies or Planet Mercenary), I’ll have to go back and re-math those.

Overall, I’d call it a 7 out of 10. The player side mechanics feel good. I need to work on the GM side mechanics/setting building mechanics. I have some ideas I’m really wanting to implement there, and I need to work out what those look like.

 

Mercenary Mondays: Dice!

Note: Mercenary Mondays is an going series of posts about the Schlock Mercenary Roleplaying Game and it’s behind the scenes development!

As any good roleplayer knows, dice are the key element of any game. The chance of randomness, failure and success is delivered, and interpreted through dice. The Schlock Mercenary Roleplaying Game uses 3 six-sided dice (abbreviated as 3d6). All rolls in the game use this particular combination of dice.

3d6

The particular color combination you see in the picture to your right is important. The odd color out is what we call “the complication dice”. It’s the dice that tells you when bad things happen! I’m not going to go into mechanical specifics, because that’s not important here. The important part is why did we chose this particular dice mechanic of 3d6 over the many other options. To do so, let’s look at the various options we have.

One of the classic dice options is the single dice roll. The most common iteration of this dice mechanic is found in the d20 system used by Wizards of the Coast for their Dungeons and Dragons products. You also find it in several Eden Studios games, and various offshoots of the d20 system (Mutants and Masterminds, any of the OSR revival products). The benefit of the d20 (and by proxy any single dice roll system) system is two-fold. The first is that every time you roll the dice, you have a 5% chance of any given number out of the 20. This provides a wide ranging level of effects and results.

The second is much simpler. You always roll the same dice. Never having to count, or pool your dice is easy. Never underestimate simple.

However, the d20 system has some pretty hefty drawbacks. The first is the same as a benefit. You generate a large number of with ranging effects. It’s possible to hit that 20 result, do great, or hit the 1 result, and do awful. You can have the same chance every time. The second is the reliance on one particular dice. That can be problematic occassional.

The next option is the dice pool system. West End Games, White Wolf, and Shadowrun are all examples of a dice pool system. The general idea is that you generate the number of dice you roll (either in d6, d10s or others), and roll the entire pool of dice, attempting to achieve success through either a target number, or looking for a set amount of results. The dice pool system has a major benefit in that you have a strong amount of averages. Check out the graph below: 
dice pool

As you can see on the graph, the multiple dice mechanic causes a bellcurve. A bellcurve provides more reliable results, and a greater chance of average success which is something we wanted in Schlock from day one.

However, we aren’t using a dice pool, instead, we’re using a fixed roll system, where in every roll in the game uses 3d6. This gives us the bellcurve of the dice pool, with the simplicity of the d20 roll. Several other games have used similar systems (Hero, the ill-fated Fuzion system) and the average curve of success allows encounters, stats, and characters to be balanced and built the same from the ground up.

I hope that helps you understand why we used the particular mechanics we did, and what they bring to the game! As usual, any questions? Throw ’em at us below.